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Last Post 01 Jan 1900 12:00 AM by  Anonymous
Memorabilia
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82089
New Member
Posts: New Member

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16 Aug 2008 12:00 AM
    I picked up two beer steins (one black eagle and one red eagle) and two ash trays (one black eagle and one red eagle) back in the early 80's. Doesn't seem to be many Ruger collectors like when I was a member back in 1980. Is there any call for these type of items? any idea on value? I want to sell them but I don't have any idea what to ask for them.
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    flattop44
    New Member
    Posts: New Member

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    16 Aug 2008 02:18 PM
    Welcome to the RCA website.

    Two of the primary reasons we constructed our website was to better serve existing members by enabling real-time communications and quick up to date sharing of information. Also we hope to attract new members to support our Ruger interest and hobby. We need member participation!! Please spread the word about our site so more members will become engaged and involved. Only then will we be successful in having a active and informative site.

    About your question, there is certainly still an interest in Ruger memorabilia items by collectors today. Other than buying items when offered by the RCA, my experience back in the 80's was that it was very hard to find those items and prices were usually farily high when you did find them. With the Internet came world wide availability and thus it become much easier to find memorabilia. But on the other side of the coin, it probably is much easier to sell it too. I personally can not give you an acurate estimate of your ash trays and mugs in today's market. It would be good if a RCA member familiar and up-to-date on values chime in and help you out. But if not, you may want to consider putting them on an auction site such as EBay and let the demand set the price. I also suggest running a search on EBay to see if you can find similar items that have sold and check their prices. You can always set a reasonable reserve so you are assured of not giving them away.

    Maybe another member will provide some better info to help you out.

    Cheers, Bill
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    flatgate
    New Member
    Posts: New Member

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    06 Sep 2008 12:09 PM
    [img]http://pic50.picturetrail.com/VOL437/657373/8140413/142636992.jpg[/img]

    I don't usually actually drink out of this one, but, just had to try it this one time!

    flatgate
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    flattop44
    New Member
    Posts: New Member

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    07 Sep 2008 01:10 AM
    That is really what they were made for anway....its just us Ruger nuts who won't drink out of 'em!! ;)
    FT44
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    m9chael1259x
    New Member
    Posts: New Member

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    08 Apr 2009 08:48 PM
    hello
    i am seeking info for a Ruger tools pistol grip hand drill

    the drill has a type bit storage magizine in the grip
    it is blued and has a hand crank fly wheel on the top
    it is the size of a small caliber pistol
    and fits in your hand just like a small pistol

    does any one know any thing about this drill or ones like it ?

    is it worth any thing?
    when was it made?

    thanks
    MVG
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    John C. Dougan
    Basic Member
    Posts:122 Basic Member

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    08 Apr 2009 11:28 PM
    Hello MVG,

    Thank you for your inquiry.

    I just completed a large book titled Ruger Pistols & Revolvers which is available from the RCA, there is a chapter that deals with all of the Ruger Corp. tools. Your tool was probably made in 1947-49 and is known as a ""precision drill"" and it is believed that most of them were used in the aircraft industy in and around Bridgeport, CT. There is no way of knowing at this time how many were produced. However, they are the most common of the Ruger Corp. tools. Notwithstanding, they are very scarce.

    If I get a chance tonight I will try to post the narrative from the draft of my book regarding these drills. There are several interesting versions. Many Ruger collectors own at least one example, and they are fun to play with, but it is a chore to drill anything with one.

    It is hard to say what the worth of your drill is, I have purchased several in the last three years and paid $150-$200 each. condition has some effect. Remember tools are not guns and are supposed to be greasy and dinged up from usage, but the nicer the better as far as value goes.

    Regards, John
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    m9chael1259x
    New Member
    Posts: New Member

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    09 Apr 2009 09:16 AM
    Thanks for the info

    Mine seems to be in very good shape
    a little rust but in good wrking order

    again thanks
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    John C. Dougan
    Basic Member
    Posts:122 Basic Member

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    10 Apr 2009 02:30 PM
    Hello MVG,

    As promised, please find below the narrative from the draft of my book Ruger Pistols & Revolvers. I hope this helps.

    THE RUGER PRECISION HAND DRILLS

    The pistol grip precision hand drills are the most commonly observed of all Ruger Corp. tools. There are a number of variants.
    It is known that WBR was working on his STANDARD PISTOL design before and during the tool making era. His pistol design called for two stamped shells welded together to form a sturdy inexpensive semi-complete pistol frame. No doubt WBR was evaluating different frame configurations at the time. He would order sets of stampings, discard them, modify the dies and order revised stampings. It is believed that there were at least three revisions. As a resourceful means of constructive disposal, the obsolete frame stampings were welded together and installed onto shortened hand drills.
    Reference to the drawing indicates that Ruger eventually revised the stamping dies to feature a rounded butt, not unlike the Standard Pistols that were later produced. Ruger’s design seems to be unique among gear drill designs. It is known that Stanley Tool Co. made a hand drill with a skeleton pistol grip; other tool makers may have offered them also.
    The Ruger Corp. ¼” drive precision hand drills all feature a blued frame and chrome vanadium plated mechanism body. The drive gear and pinion gear arrangement is identical in every respect to the Ruger hand drill. There is a hinged door in the butt that opens to store extra bits inside the hollow grip frame. The red 3 ½” gear wheel is the same as those employed on the hand drill. It is believed that most of the precision hand drills were used in the aircraft industry. Several minor variants are evident in this series of drills;

    Type I. Black painted wood or spun aluminum crank knob. A threaded round nut with ¼” X ¾” rectangle wedge extensions is fitted laterally through slots in the frame to retain the gear wheel arbor, the wedge is installed between the frame-shells at the time they are spot welded together. The wedge is installed laterally through holes in the frame to retain the gear wheel arbor. Drills have been observed featuring a slot across the head of the arbor to accommodate a large screwdriver.

    Type II. Black painted wood or spun aluminum crank knob. The arbor retaining arrangement is much simpler than its predecessor and eliminates at least three of the machine operations required on the previous Type.
    The nut is a threaded spherical nut with ¼” diameter extensions fitted between the frame-shells at the time they are spot welded together, the nut is also spot welded to prevent it from rotating.
    These tools feature a large dimple stamped into both sides of the frame shells that would serve as a magazine guide if made into a pistol.

    Type III. These are the same as Type II with a 4 ½” two position extended crank handle. The same markings appear on this series of drills that are present on the hand drills. Some pieces are not marked, others are stamped on the flat of the crank arm, some are rolled on the mechanism body adjacent to the chuck and a few are marked in both places.

    These well made and finished tools are without doubt unique among precision hand drill designs. It is sufficient to say that a rather extensive collection of precision hand drills could be assembled if the mix of marking, knob and retainer shaft variants were included.

    Regards, John
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